CFP The Shattuck Colonial American History Symposium

 March 4, 2022 to March 6, 2022, Sacramento, CA

“The past,” L.P. Hartley wrote in his steady-selling novel, The Go-Between, “is a foreign country; they do things differently there.” In addition to exploring the veracity of Hartley’s words, the aim of this symposium is to provide a forum for historians, scholars, and students, west of the Rocky Mountains, to exchange ideas about early American history.  

Both individual and panel proposals are welcomed. The theme is Becoming Americans. Proposals should relate to any aspect of early American history, from 1607 to 1826. They should be no longer than 500 words and include a 1-page curriculum vitae for the presenter(s). All submissions should be filed as one document, preferably in .doc or .docx format and must include: 

• A paper or panel title and a brief description. 

• Email and institutional affiliation for designated contact person(s).

• A single page curriculum vitae for each participant.

• An indication of accommodations.

• An indication of AV needs.

The deadline for individual and panel proposals is Friday, December 17, 2021. Please submit proposals by email to history@csus.edu. Be sure to include “The Shattuck Colonial American History Symposium” in the subject line. If there are any questions, please contact Dr. Antonio T. Bly, the symposium organizer and the Peter H. Shattuck Endowed Chair in Colonial American History, at antonio.bly@csus.edu.

The symposium’s keynote speaker will be Dr. Robert A. Gross, Draper Professor of Early American History, Professor Emeritus, University of Connecticut, and author of The Minutemen and their World and The Transcendentalists and Their World. Mrs. Nicole Brown, M.A., a public historian at Colonial Williamsburg, will also lead an interactive discussion about colonial American women and the challenges of teaching the eighteenth-century in the twenty-first.

Contact Info: Dr. Antonio T. Bly, Peter H. Shattuck Endowed Chair in Colonial American History, Department of History, California State University, Sacramento, 6000 J Street, Tahoe Hall, 3084, MS 6059, Sacramento, CA 95819

Voice: (916) 278-6340 | Fax (916) 278-7476

Contact Email: antonio.bly@csus.edu

URL: https://www.csus.edu/college/arts-letters/history/shattuck-endowment/

CFP: “New and Emerging Studies of the Spanish Colonial Borderlands” Graduate Workshop (March 11, 2022)

This workshop seeks to bring together advanced graduate students in the field of the Spanish Borderlands to bolster intellectual exchange and create community among graduate students and interested faculty working on similar or related topics. Successful workshop presentation proposals should highlight new and emerging research on the Spanish Borderlands and focus on some aspect of California, Arizona, New Mexico, Texas, Louisiana, Florida or related regions from the sixteenth through the nineteenth centuries.  

Papers will be organized into one-hour sessions derived from larger dissertation chapters.  Workshopping of the papers by participants and organizers will follow. Participants agree to submit a 25–35 page, footnoted paper by February 25, 2022 and attend the all-day workshop on Friday March 11, 2022.  

For full consideration a proposal, bibliography, and CV must be submitted by November 1, 2021, to emsi@dornsife.usc.edu.  

Paper proposals should be no more than 300 words and include a separate two-page bibliography of primary and secondary sources. Please put all materials in a single pdf/word document.  The organizers will respond by December 20, 2020.

Email any questions to alejandra.dubcovsky@ucr.edu.

The workshop will be held Friday March 11, 2022.

PLEASE NOTE: While we hope to meet in person, we will make sure to prioritize health and safety when making final arrangements for the conference.

Organized with generous support from the USC-Huntington Early Modern Studies Institute Seminar on Borderlands History, The Huntington-USC Institute on California and the West, UC Riverside College of Humanities and Social Sciences, and The Huntington Library. 

Contact Email: alejandra.dubcovsky@ucr.edu

Consortium on Revolutionary Era Annual Conference: February 10-12, 2022

The Consortium on the Revolutionary Era invites proposals for its 52nd annual conference to be held February 10-12, 2022, at Mississippi State University in Starkville, MS.  The Consortium (CRE) welcomes papers on any topic related to the period 1750-1850 in any geographical location.   While the conference has traditionally welcomed scholars focusing on Europe, the United States, and the Atlantic World, we would also welcome panels that expand our understanding of the Revolutionary Era to include the Pacific, Latin America, Africa, and all places in between.    

We invite submissions of both individual papers and fully formed sessions from faculty, graduate students, and independent scholars working in any discipline and on any topic exploring the Revolutionary Era.  In addition to standard sessions (three or four papers, plus a chair and a commentator) and roundtables (five or six ten-minute presentations), we will also consider any innovative ideas for session formats—including presentation and discussion via distance technologies. 

Session proposals should include a panel description, a brief abstract for each paper (no more than one page), and a brief CV for each participant (no more than 2 pages.) Individual paper proposals should include a brief abstract (one page) and CV (no more than 2 pages).  Proposals from graduate students and independent scholars are welcome.  We urge panel organizers to consider diversity of presenters and topics as they build their sessions. Preference will be given to panels that capture gender, racial, and stage-in-career diversity. Please submit proposals to Dr. Marc Lerner (mlerner@olemiss.edu) by November 1, 2020.

For more information about the CRE and the conference, visit the CRE Website (https://www.revolutionaryera.org/).

Contact Info: 

Dr. Marc Lerner

University of Mississippi

Contact Email: mlerner@olemiss.edu

URL: https://www.revolutionaryera.org/

The New American Antiquarian, no. 1

Call for Papers

The New American Antiquarian (NAA), a new peer-reviewed journal dedicated to reconstructing the hemispheric American past to 1825 A.D. through the publication of critically edited source material, invites submissions for its inaugural issue.

NAA welcomes submissions of previously unpublished manuscript transcriptions; new English translations; collations of printed material; guides or catalogs that aid in the interpretation of source collections; and scholarship that interrogates the American archive. NAA is committed to expanding the source base and scholarly horizon of early American history and literature to reflect the hemisphere’s plural linguistic traditions.

We encourage submissions of sources or scholarship written in Spanish or French, though all publications will eventually be printed in English. The journal is additionally committed to publishing work that originates from a broad swathe of humanistic disciplines as well as from outside the academy.

The NAA envisions itself as a platform that enriches current intellectual discussions of historical evidence by fostering a new scholarly discourse around the reception and antiquation of ideas, practices, and institutions. We are interested in generating conversation around the intersection of—and slippage between—history, the archive, and knowledge of the past. Our mission entails a wider consideration of early America within a vast intellectual tradition of transatlantic antiquity.

We welcome submissions of up to 10,000 words (excluding footnotes)/ 14,000 words (including footnotes). All submissions should be formatted in Chicago style. NAA intends to publish its issues in PDF format. Authors are welcome to submit digital supplements, such as XML files or photographs of archival documents, for parallel distribution through NAA’s platform. The editors will anonymize submissions for the peer-review process. We hope to develop an accessible online submission platform in the near future.

NAA is edited by Peter Jakob Olsen-Harbich (pjolsenharbich@email.wm.edu) and Simeon A. Simeonov (simeon_simeonov@alumni.brown.edu). All submissions should be sent to newamericanantiquarian@gmail.com.

We are also interested in expanding our editorial board, reviewer pool, and potentially in forming a relationship with an academic press. We welcome all interested readers to contact us via the institutional email above, and to follow us on Twitter: @new_antiquarian

Forum on Early-Modern Empires and Global Interactions 2022 Conference (Extended Deadline)

The Forum on Early-Modern Empires and Global Interactions (FEEGI) invites paper proposals for its fourteenth biennial conference, to be held online February 24-26, 2022.

FEEGI conferences investigate the histories of places and people touched directly and indirectly, advantageously or catastrophically, by the process of enhanced global interactions that commenced in the fifteenth century. Our conferences provide an opportunity for exchanges about the circumstances, causes, and consequences of increased global interactions in the early modern period (roughly 1450 to 1850). We welcome proposals exploring political, economics, and socio-cultural interactions from a variety of fields and perspectives. We encourage interdisciplinary approaches. 

One hallmark of FEEGI conferences is the creation of a space for comparative thinking and intellectual exchange among scholars across traditional temporal, geographic, and imperial boundaries. To promote such dialogue the Program Committee configures panels to make deep thematic connections, and all our sessions are plenary. 

FEEGI members may submit proposals for individual papers no later than September 10, 2021 on http://www.feegi.org/conferences.

(Details on membership can be found on http://feegi.org/membership.html )

Submissions should include a 200-400 word abstract as well as a brief (1-2 page) C.V.

We welcome submissions from advanced graduate students. 

Papers accepted for the program will be eligible for consideration for the FEEGI/Itinerario article prize, with the winning paper receiving a “fast-track” to publication in Itinerario: Journal of Imperial and Global Interactions by the end of 2022. For those interested in the prize, full-length articles will be submitted to a prize committee before the conference.  Further details, including the timeline, will be available once the program is finalized.

Contact Info: 

FEEGI 2022 Program Committee:

Karen Auman, Brigham Young University

Ernesto Bassi, Cornell University

Susan Mokhberi, Rutgers University

Wensheng Wang, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa

Matt Romaniello, FEEGI president, Weber State University

Contact Email: matthewromaniello@weber.edu

URL: http://feegi.org/conferences.html

Second Annual Materializing Race “Unconference” on Objects and Identity in #VastEarlyAmerica (zoom)

Wednesday 25 August 2020 (Zoom), 1-3 PM EDT
Proposals due by 1 August 2020

In a commitment to fostering nuanced interpretations of early American objects and meaningful dialogue on historical constructions of race and their legacies, we invite panelists to virtually share and discuss research on the intersections of identity and material culture in #VastEarlyAmerica. Our annual “unconference” seeks to promote a diverse cross-section of scholarship on North, Central, and South America and the Caribbean circa 1450-1830. We welcome approaches and methodologies including the historical, art historical, anthropological, archaeological, and experimental/experiential. Current graduate students, PhDs, ECRs, curators, museum and historic trades interpreters, artists and practitioners of historic methods and crafts, and independent/unaffiliated scholars are all eligible to participate as speakers, with a special welcome to BIPOC, AAPI, #WomenAlsoKnowHistory, and LGBTQ2+.

Proposals should be object-focused and include a brief abstract (250 words + one relevant image) for a 10-15-minute presentation, along with a short CV of no more than 2 pages. Papers addressing topics beyond the geographic and/or temporal scope of #VastEarlyAmerica will not be considered. 

Potential questions and themes for presentations might include:

  • “Things in context” and interpretations of early American objects through the lenses of race, ethnicity, and identity, 1450-1830
  • Potential methodological approaches and revisions/additions to existing material culture frameworks
  • How can #VastEarlyAmerica work to expand the traditional American material culture canon and related connoisseurship? 
  • Historians and material culture specialists as genealogists: how do our own personal family/ancestral narratives intersect with our study of early American history and material culture; the historian as biographer; the biographical object and the object biography
  • Public history, from the exhibition and display of objects in museum settings to historical and character interpretation, to include historic trades and foodways

Papers will be grouped by panel, followed by a moderated group discussion and audience questions via Zoom. In an effort to safeguard our participants and their creative and intellectual property, this event will not be recorded. ​

This event is co-convened by Dr. Cynthia Chin (Fred W. Smith National Library for the Study of George Washington) and Philippe Halbert (Yale History of Art). For more information, submission requirements, and audience registration (TBA) details, please visit the event page on the Materializing Race website.

Contact Email: materializingrace@gmail.com

URL: https://www.materializingrace.com/2021annualunconference

CFP: Forum on Early-Modern Empires and Global Interactions (FEEGI) biennial conference

The Forum on Early-Modern Empires and Global Interactions (FEEGI) invites paper proposals for its fourteenth biennial conference, to be held online February 24-26, 2022.

FEEGI conferences investigate the histories of places and people touched directly and indirectly, advantageously or catastrophically, by the process of enhanced global interactions that commenced in the fifteenth century. Our conferences provide an opportunity for exchanges about the circumstances, causes, and consequences of increased global interactions in the early modern period (roughly 1450 to 1850). We welcome proposals exploring political, economics, and socio-cultural interactions from a variety of fields and perspectives. We encourage interdisciplinary approaches. 

One hallmark of FEEGI conferences is the creation of a space for comparative thinking and intellectual exchange among scholars across traditional temporal, geographic, and imperial boundaries. To promote such dialogue the Program Committee configures panels to make deep thematic connections, and all our sessions are plenary. 

FEEGI members may submit proposals for individual papers no later than 30 August 2021 on http://www.feegi.org/conferences. (Details on membership can be found on http://feegi.org/membership.html ). Submissions should include a 200-400 word abstract as well as a brief (1-2 page) C.V. We welcome submissions from advanced graduate students.  

Papers accepted for the program will be eligible for consideration for the FEEGI/Itinerario article prize, with the winning paper receiving a “fast-track” to publication in Itinerario: Journal of Imperial and Global Interactions by the end of 2022. For those interested in the prize, full-length articles will be submitted to a prize committee before the conference.  Further details, including the timeline, will be available once the program is finalized.  

FEEGI 2022 Program Committee:

Karen Auman, Brigham Young University

Ernesto Bassi, Cornell University

Susan Mokhberi, Rutgers University

Wensheng Wang, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa

Matt Romaniello, FEEGI president, Weber State University 

Contact Email: FEEGI2022@gmail.com

URL: http://feegi.org/conferences.html

CFP: The Hakluyt Society Symposium 2021 – Decolonising Travel Studies

by Guido van Meersbergen, reposted from H-Atlantic June 14/06/2021

Decolonising Travel Studies: Sources and Approaches

11-12 November 2021 

University of Warwick (online)

Deadline for submissions: 1 July 2021

The close links between travel and European colonialism have long been acknowledged. Since the early modern period, forms of global travel and exploration have often produced and reflected unequal structures of power: between those who chose to travel and those forced to, those who claimed lands and those whose lands were claimed, and those whose voices were amplified and others whose voices were erased. Post-colonial, feminist, and other critiques have exposed the inequalities inherent in the history of travel, whilst increased attention to women travellers and travel writing in Arabic, Persian, Chinese and other languages is changing the ways in which this history is written. Nonetheless, for reasons of institutional culture and the availability and accessibility of sources, the academic study of travel remains largely skewed towards the accounts and perspectives of European men from a small number of former imperial nations.

To mark the Hakluyt Society’s 175th anniversary, the Hakluyt Society Symposium 2021 aims to take stock of the historiography on global travel and exploration and reflect on what a decolonised history of travel looks like in theory and practice. Hosted by the University of Warwick’s Global History and Culture Centre (GHCC), the online symposium will bring together students and academics working across historical periods in an interdisciplinary conversation around the sources, approaches, and perspectives required to decolonise the field. Abstracts (max. 300 words) are invited for 15-minute papers that engage with one or more of the following:

  • The historical development of and colonial legacies contained in travel and exploration studies, including primary source editions such as the 380+ volumes published by the Hakluyt Society since 1847.
  • Empirical case studies of underrepresented histories of travel, particularly those that focus on BIPOC, women, and/or LQBTQ+ travellers and perspectives.
  • The politics of the archive, and the ways in which particular methodologies have rendered certain demographics (women of colour, unfree people and disabled people, for instance) absent or invisible in the histories of colonialism and travel.
  • The theory and practice of decolonisation as it pertains to the history of travel, particularly with the aim of identifying future directions for the discipline.
  • Unpublished sources for the history of travel, ideally those which might be proposed for editing within the Hakluyt Society’s Third Series.

Please submit your abstracts and a brief biographical note to hakluytsymposium2021@gmail.com by 1 July 2021. Early career researchers and postgraduate students are particularly encouraged to apply.

Organising committee: Natalya Din-Kariuki (University of Warwick, English) and Guido van Meersbergen (University of Warwick, History). In collaboration with Medieval and Early Modern Orients (MEMOs). Download CFP.

Seeking Freedom: The Underground Railroad in the Mid-Atlantic

From H-Atlantic, June 2, 2021

Lincoln University and Voices Underground 2021 CFP

Lincoln University, Pennsylvania

March 31, April 1-2, 2022

The Lincoln University Center for the Study of the Underground Railroad and Voices Underground, an organization focused on preserving and sharing the Underground Railroad’s story, welcomes proposals for its inaugural 2022 conference, Seeking Freedom: The Underground Railroad in the Mid-Atlantic. The conference will take place at Lincoln University on March 31, April 1-2, 2022.

We welcome proposals from all fields and disciplines, from historians, preservationists, independent scholars, social scientists, community leaders, undergraduate, and graduate students. Of particular interest are the lower eastern middle states of Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, and southern New York.  We encourage individuals who are researching sites of memory, the role of historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) such as Lincoln University and Cheyney University, and the importance of the free and enslaved African American community through the end of the Civil War to submit. We also desire papers that explore any or all the diverse complexities of the UGRR, including known and unknown physical sites (homes, corridors, routes) and those that extract the voices of the unheard, invisible, and underrated. As such, we welcome research that demythologizes the story and memory of the UGRR. Individuals may also suggest and write on topics that are not listed if the subject falls within this symposium’s overall theme. The following list provides possible areas of inquiry.

  • African Agency
  • Architecture
  • Biographies
  • Community Organizing
  • Economy
  • Law in the 19th century
  • Literature
  • Politics
  • Propaganda
  • Preservation
  • Religious Institutions
  • Resistance and Violence
  • Spirituals/Songs
  • Women in the UGRR

The organizing committee will consider individual papers, panels, and roundtables. Panels and roundtables must designate or suggest a commentator and moderator separate from the presenters. Each participant will be allotted twenty minutes to present.

Proposals for panels and roundtables should include a brief session description (one to two pages), the theme, a 300-word maximum abstract for each participant’s paper, and a short bio (200 words max) of each participant including the moderator, chair and/or commentator. Proposals for individual presentations should also include a 300-word abstract and a short bio (200 words max). All submissions should include each person’s C.V. or résumé (5-page max) including contact information (complete mailing address, the institution or organization’s name (if applicable), an email address, and phone number). Please use the following link to submit. https://www.lincoln.edu/lincoln-university-and-voices-underground-railroad-conference-submission-form

Participants are responsible for their own lodging and transportation. 

Priority will be given to prospective participants who submit by October 15, 2021. After this date, the committee will review submissions on a rolling basis. We plan to announce the acceptance of regular submissions by December 15, 2021. 

Inquiries can be sent to ugrrconference@lincoln.edu

For further information please visit https://www.lincoln.edu/ugrrconference           

Convening Committee:

Dr. Nafeesa Muhammad 

Professor of History                                              

Lincoln University, PA

nmuhammad@lincoln.edu

Dr. Gregory Thompson

Executive Director | Voices Underground

greg@vuproject.org

www.vuproject.org

Dr. Paul Finkelman

President

Gratz College

pfinkelman@gratz.edu

Contact Info:  Dr. Nora Lynn Gardner at ugrrconference@lincoln.edu 

Contact Email: ugrrconference@lincoln.edu

URL: https://www.lincoln.edu/ugrrconference

CFP 2022 LACS-SHA

Latin American and Caribbean Section of the Southern Historical Association

Baltimore, Maryland, November 10-13, 2022

The Latin American and Caribbean Section (LACS) of the Southern Historical Association welcomes individual paper and panel proposals for the SHA’s 88th Annual Meeting to be held in Baltimore, Maryland, November 10-13. 

LACS accepts papers and panels on all aspects of Latin American and Caribbean history, including the fields of the borderlands and the Atlantic World. Panels and papers that highlight the connections between people, cultures, and regions are especially welcome. Submissions should include a 250-word abstract for each paper and brief (one-page) curriculum vitae for each presenter. We encourage faculty as well as advanced graduate students to submit panels and papers.  Presenters who will need AV equipment must request them as soon as the call from SHA appears.  

Graduate students are eligible for the Ralph Lee Woodward Jr. Prize, awarded each year for the best paper presented by a graduate student in a panel organized by LACS. 

Please note that the program committee may need to revise proposed panels. All panelists are required to be members of LACS before presenting. For information about membership, please visit the website at http://www.tnstate.edu/lacs/or contact Erica Johnson Edwards of the Francis Marion University: ejohnson@fmarion.edu. For more information about the Southern Historical Association, visit the website: http://thesha.org

Deadline for submissions is November 1, 2021. Complete panels are appreciated, but not required. 

Submit panels and papers to: Adriana Chira, Emory University: achira@emory.edu

Contact Info: Adriana Chira, Emory University

Contact Email: achira@emory.edu

Search OpenEdition Search

You will be redirected to OpenEdition Search