Hakluyt Society Symposium 2021

Decolonising Travel Studies: Sources and Approaches

10-12 November 2021
University of Warwick (online via Zoom)
(All times are GMT+0/UTC)

The Hakluyt Society, the Global History and Culture Centre (GHCC) at 
the University of Warwick, and Medieval and Early Modern Orients 
(MEMOs), invite you to the Hakluyt Society Symposium 2021 – 
Decolonising Travel Studies: Sources and Approaches. Attendance is 
free and all are welcome.

To register, please email: hakluytsymposium2021@gmail.com
Contacts: Natalya Din-Kariuki (Natalya.Din-Kariuki@warwick.ac.uk) and 
Guido van Meersbergen (G.van-Meersbergen@warwick.ac.uk)

Day 1: Wednesday 10 November 2021

14.00-14.15: Introduction and Welcome (Natalya Din-Kariuki and Guido 
van Meersbergen)

14.15-15.45: Panel 1: Decolonising Travel Studies in Theory and 
Practice (Chair: Caitlin Vandertop)
•Daniel Vitkus: “Racialized Capitalism, Intersectionality, and Early 
Modern Travel Studies”
•Denise Saive Castro: “Contemplating Slavery on the African West 
Coast: A Comparison of Portuguese and Dutch Travel Accounts with the 
Correspondence of Nepemba Angiga, also known as Afonso I of Kongo”
•Sander Molenaar: “Deconstructing the ‘Imperial Gaze’ in Chinese 
Travel Writing: A New Look at Ma Huan’s Ying ya sheng lan (Overall 
Survey of the Ocean’s Shores)”
•Carl Thompson: “Conjectures on Travel Writing as World Literature”

15.45-16.00: Break

16.00-17.15: Panel 2: Travel and Decolonisation Today (Chair: Ladan 
Niayesh)
•Sandhya Patel: “Peopling the Pitt Rivers Cook-Voyage Collections on 
the World Wide Web”
•R. Benedito Ferrão: “The Black Antarctic: Decoloniality and Queer 
Ecology in Mojisola Adebayo’s Moj of the Antarctic”
•Joanne Lee: “All Roads Lead to Africa: Decolonizing the Imperial 
City”

17.15-17.30: Break

17.30-19.00: Panel 3: Images and Imaginations: Visual and Cartographic 
Sources (Chair: Daniel Carey)
•Farah Bazzi: “Seeing the ‘Maghreb’ by Looking at the Americas: 
Rethinking the Transmission of Cartographic Knowledge in the Ottoman 
World through the Piri Reis Map of 1513”
•Louise McCarthy: “Cartographic Silence and Muted Voices: Reading the 
Subtexts of British Maps of Early Colonial Virginia (1606-1624)
•Sara Caputo: “Travels Carved on the Pathless Ocean: European Ship 
Tracks and (De)colonial Mobility”
•Apurba Chatterjee: “Travel, Visuality, and the British Indian Empire: 
James Baillie Fraser in the Himalayas”

Day 2: Thursday 11 November 2021

09.30-10.45: Roundtable 1: Decolonial Orientations: Travel Studies and 
the Pre-Modern Islamic World by Medieval and Early Modern Orients 
(Chair: Lubaaba Al-Azami)
•Speakers: Amrita Sen, Maria Shmygol, Nat Cutter, and Hassana Moosa

10.45- 11.15: Break

11.15- 12.15: Roundtable 2: A Student-led Conversation by participants 
of the Warwick Undergraduate Research Support Scheme (Chair: Guido van 
Meersbergen)
•Speakers: Chhaya Rai, Nida Mahmud, Kevin Molloy, Declan Dadzie

12.15-12.30: Publishing with the Hakluyt Society: What and How?
•Speaker: Katherine Parker

12.30-13.15 Lunch break

13.15-14.30 Panel 4: Black Travellers in the Twentieth Century: 
Oppression and Liberation (Chair: Christine Okoth)
•Kiranpreet Kaur: “Eslanda Robeson’s Congo Diary”
•Zachary Peterson: “Africans in America and Americans in Africa: The 
American Committee on Africa, its Travels to the Continent, and its 
Sponsorship of African Travelers to the US”
•Janet Remmington: “Navigating Apartheid: Black Women Travelling”

14.30-14.45: Break

14.45-16.00: Panel 5: New Sources, Genres, and Perspectives (Chair: 
Julia Kuehn)
•Judith E. Bosnak: “Javanese Language Travelogues as ‘New’ Sources for 
the History of Travel”
•Gábor Gelléri: “Colonial Tourism, De-centered”
•Ettore Morelli: “The Diary of Morena Abraham Aaron Moletsane mor’a 
Moroa-ha-a-buse, 1952: African Traveller and Historian”

16.00-16.30: Break

16.30-18.00: KEYNOTE LECTURE: “Travelling While Black” (Chair: Natalya 
Din-Kariuki)
SPEAKER: Nanjala Nyabola
Author of Travelling While Black (2020)

Day 3: Friday 12 November 2021

09.30-10.45: Roundtable 3: Decolonial Approaches to British Sources 
and Archives by TIDE (Chair: Nandini Das)
•Speakers: Haig Smith, Lauren Working, Emily Stevenson, and Tom 
Roberts

10.45-11.15: Break

11.15-12.30: Panel 6: Recovering Indigenous Voices (Chair: Joan-Pau 
Rubiés)
•Zoltán Biedermann: “Seeing the Invisible Hand: Retrieving Indigenous 
Agency from Early Iberian Travel Accounts, c.1500”
•Lucas Aleixo Pires dos Reis & Roberth Daylon: “‘Foods that are 
self-served’: Methodologies for the Study of Unstated African 
Presences in Travel Accounts”
•Anna Melinda Testa-De Ocampo: “Alexander Dalrymple and the Natural 
Curiosities in Sooloo (1770)”

12.30-13.30: Lunch break

13.30-14.45: Panel 7: South Asian Travellers, Religion, and 
Transnationalism (Chair: Somak Biswas)
•Daniel Majchrowicz: “Muslim Women and Travel Writing: Rediscovering a 
Forgotten Archive”
•Muhamed Riyaz Chenganakkattil: “‘Connected Stories’ of Muslim 
Pilgrimage to Mecca: Decolonizing the Travel Writing through South 
Asian Hajj Narratives”
•Nupur Bandyopadhyay: “A Journey to Justice: Transnational Civil 
Rights and Ramnath Biswas, an Indian Globetrotter from Bengal, 
1937-40”

14.45-15.15 Break

15.15-16.30: Panel 8: Reorienting Travel Studies: Perspectives from 
Europe’s Fringes (Chair: Eva Johanna Holmberg)
•Sharyl Corrado: “Evgeniia Maier (1865-1951): Noblewoman and Nomad”
•Janne Lahti: “Settler Colonial Eyes in Unexpected Places: Finnish 
Travel Writers and Settler Colonization on the Arctic Ocean”
•Nadiya Chushak: “‘First female travel blogger’: Sofiya 
Yablonska-Oudin’s Works and their Perception in Contemporary Ukraine”

16.45-18.00: Decolonising Travel Studies in the Classroom (Chair: 
Natalya Din-Kariuki and Eva Johanna Holmberg)
•Speakers: Nandini Das, Jyotsna Singh, Nedda Mehdizadeh, and Gerald 
Maclean

18.00: CONFERENCE ENDS

Consortium on Revolutionary Era Annual Conference: February 10-12, 2022

The Consortium on the Revolutionary Era invites proposals for its 52nd annual conference to be held February 10-12, 2022, at Mississippi State University in Starkville, MS.  The Consortium (CRE) welcomes papers on any topic related to the period 1750-1850 in any geographical location.   While the conference has traditionally welcomed scholars focusing on Europe, the United States, and the Atlantic World, we would also welcome panels that expand our understanding of the Revolutionary Era to include the Pacific, Latin America, Africa, and all places in between.    

We invite submissions of both individual papers and fully formed sessions from faculty, graduate students, and independent scholars working in any discipline and on any topic exploring the Revolutionary Era.  In addition to standard sessions (three or four papers, plus a chair and a commentator) and roundtables (five or six ten-minute presentations), we will also consider any innovative ideas for session formats—including presentation and discussion via distance technologies. 

Session proposals should include a panel description, a brief abstract for each paper (no more than one page), and a brief CV for each participant (no more than 2 pages.) Individual paper proposals should include a brief abstract (one page) and CV (no more than 2 pages).  Proposals from graduate students and independent scholars are welcome.  We urge panel organizers to consider diversity of presenters and topics as they build their sessions. Preference will be given to panels that capture gender, racial, and stage-in-career diversity. Please submit proposals to Dr. Marc Lerner (mlerner@olemiss.edu) by November 1, 2020.

For more information about the CRE and the conference, visit the CRE Website (https://www.revolutionaryera.org/).

Contact Info: 

Dr. Marc Lerner

University of Mississippi

Contact Email: mlerner@olemiss.edu

URL: https://www.revolutionaryera.org/

Forum on Early-Modern Empires and Global Interactions 2022 Conference (Extended Deadline)

The Forum on Early-Modern Empires and Global Interactions (FEEGI) invites paper proposals for its fourteenth biennial conference, to be held online February 24-26, 2022.

FEEGI conferences investigate the histories of places and people touched directly and indirectly, advantageously or catastrophically, by the process of enhanced global interactions that commenced in the fifteenth century. Our conferences provide an opportunity for exchanges about the circumstances, causes, and consequences of increased global interactions in the early modern period (roughly 1450 to 1850). We welcome proposals exploring political, economics, and socio-cultural interactions from a variety of fields and perspectives. We encourage interdisciplinary approaches. 

One hallmark of FEEGI conferences is the creation of a space for comparative thinking and intellectual exchange among scholars across traditional temporal, geographic, and imperial boundaries. To promote such dialogue the Program Committee configures panels to make deep thematic connections, and all our sessions are plenary. 

FEEGI members may submit proposals for individual papers no later than September 10, 2021 on http://www.feegi.org/conferences.

(Details on membership can be found on http://feegi.org/membership.html )

Submissions should include a 200-400 word abstract as well as a brief (1-2 page) C.V.

We welcome submissions from advanced graduate students. 

Papers accepted for the program will be eligible for consideration for the FEEGI/Itinerario article prize, with the winning paper receiving a “fast-track” to publication in Itinerario: Journal of Imperial and Global Interactions by the end of 2022. For those interested in the prize, full-length articles will be submitted to a prize committee before the conference.  Further details, including the timeline, will be available once the program is finalized.

Contact Info: 

FEEGI 2022 Program Committee:

Karen Auman, Brigham Young University

Ernesto Bassi, Cornell University

Susan Mokhberi, Rutgers University

Wensheng Wang, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa

Matt Romaniello, FEEGI president, Weber State University

Contact Email: matthewromaniello@weber.edu

URL: http://feegi.org/conferences.html

Second Annual Materializing Race “Unconference” on Objects and Identity in #VastEarlyAmerica (zoom)

Wednesday 25 August 2020 (Zoom), 1-3 PM EDT
Proposals due by 1 August 2020

In a commitment to fostering nuanced interpretations of early American objects and meaningful dialogue on historical constructions of race and their legacies, we invite panelists to virtually share and discuss research on the intersections of identity and material culture in #VastEarlyAmerica. Our annual “unconference” seeks to promote a diverse cross-section of scholarship on North, Central, and South America and the Caribbean circa 1450-1830. We welcome approaches and methodologies including the historical, art historical, anthropological, archaeological, and experimental/experiential. Current graduate students, PhDs, ECRs, curators, museum and historic trades interpreters, artists and practitioners of historic methods and crafts, and independent/unaffiliated scholars are all eligible to participate as speakers, with a special welcome to BIPOC, AAPI, #WomenAlsoKnowHistory, and LGBTQ2+.

Proposals should be object-focused and include a brief abstract (250 words + one relevant image) for a 10-15-minute presentation, along with a short CV of no more than 2 pages. Papers addressing topics beyond the geographic and/or temporal scope of #VastEarlyAmerica will not be considered. 

Potential questions and themes for presentations might include:

  • “Things in context” and interpretations of early American objects through the lenses of race, ethnicity, and identity, 1450-1830
  • Potential methodological approaches and revisions/additions to existing material culture frameworks
  • How can #VastEarlyAmerica work to expand the traditional American material culture canon and related connoisseurship? 
  • Historians and material culture specialists as genealogists: how do our own personal family/ancestral narratives intersect with our study of early American history and material culture; the historian as biographer; the biographical object and the object biography
  • Public history, from the exhibition and display of objects in museum settings to historical and character interpretation, to include historic trades and foodways

Papers will be grouped by panel, followed by a moderated group discussion and audience questions via Zoom. In an effort to safeguard our participants and their creative and intellectual property, this event will not be recorded. ​

This event is co-convened by Dr. Cynthia Chin (Fred W. Smith National Library for the Study of George Washington) and Philippe Halbert (Yale History of Art). For more information, submission requirements, and audience registration (TBA) details, please visit the event page on the Materializing Race website.

Contact Email: materializingrace@gmail.com

URL: https://www.materializingrace.com/2021annualunconference

CFP: Forum on Early-Modern Empires and Global Interactions (FEEGI) biennial conference

The Forum on Early-Modern Empires and Global Interactions (FEEGI) invites paper proposals for its fourteenth biennial conference, to be held online February 24-26, 2022.

FEEGI conferences investigate the histories of places and people touched directly and indirectly, advantageously or catastrophically, by the process of enhanced global interactions that commenced in the fifteenth century. Our conferences provide an opportunity for exchanges about the circumstances, causes, and consequences of increased global interactions in the early modern period (roughly 1450 to 1850). We welcome proposals exploring political, economics, and socio-cultural interactions from a variety of fields and perspectives. We encourage interdisciplinary approaches. 

One hallmark of FEEGI conferences is the creation of a space for comparative thinking and intellectual exchange among scholars across traditional temporal, geographic, and imperial boundaries. To promote such dialogue the Program Committee configures panels to make deep thematic connections, and all our sessions are plenary. 

FEEGI members may submit proposals for individual papers no later than 30 August 2021 on http://www.feegi.org/conferences. (Details on membership can be found on http://feegi.org/membership.html ). Submissions should include a 200-400 word abstract as well as a brief (1-2 page) C.V. We welcome submissions from advanced graduate students.  

Papers accepted for the program will be eligible for consideration for the FEEGI/Itinerario article prize, with the winning paper receiving a “fast-track” to publication in Itinerario: Journal of Imperial and Global Interactions by the end of 2022. For those interested in the prize, full-length articles will be submitted to a prize committee before the conference.  Further details, including the timeline, will be available once the program is finalized.  

FEEGI 2022 Program Committee:

Karen Auman, Brigham Young University

Ernesto Bassi, Cornell University

Susan Mokhberi, Rutgers University

Wensheng Wang, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa

Matt Romaniello, FEEGI president, Weber State University 

Contact Email: FEEGI2022@gmail.com

URL: http://feegi.org/conferences.html

Seeking Freedom: The Underground Railroad in the Mid-Atlantic

From H-Atlantic, June 2, 2021

Lincoln University and Voices Underground 2021 CFP

Lincoln University, Pennsylvania

March 31, April 1-2, 2022

The Lincoln University Center for the Study of the Underground Railroad and Voices Underground, an organization focused on preserving and sharing the Underground Railroad’s story, welcomes proposals for its inaugural 2022 conference, Seeking Freedom: The Underground Railroad in the Mid-Atlantic. The conference will take place at Lincoln University on March 31, April 1-2, 2022.

We welcome proposals from all fields and disciplines, from historians, preservationists, independent scholars, social scientists, community leaders, undergraduate, and graduate students. Of particular interest are the lower eastern middle states of Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, and southern New York.  We encourage individuals who are researching sites of memory, the role of historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) such as Lincoln University and Cheyney University, and the importance of the free and enslaved African American community through the end of the Civil War to submit. We also desire papers that explore any or all the diverse complexities of the UGRR, including known and unknown physical sites (homes, corridors, routes) and those that extract the voices of the unheard, invisible, and underrated. As such, we welcome research that demythologizes the story and memory of the UGRR. Individuals may also suggest and write on topics that are not listed if the subject falls within this symposium’s overall theme. The following list provides possible areas of inquiry.

  • African Agency
  • Architecture
  • Biographies
  • Community Organizing
  • Economy
  • Law in the 19th century
  • Literature
  • Politics
  • Propaganda
  • Preservation
  • Religious Institutions
  • Resistance and Violence
  • Spirituals/Songs
  • Women in the UGRR

The organizing committee will consider individual papers, panels, and roundtables. Panels and roundtables must designate or suggest a commentator and moderator separate from the presenters. Each participant will be allotted twenty minutes to present.

Proposals for panels and roundtables should include a brief session description (one to two pages), the theme, a 300-word maximum abstract for each participant’s paper, and a short bio (200 words max) of each participant including the moderator, chair and/or commentator. Proposals for individual presentations should also include a 300-word abstract and a short bio (200 words max). All submissions should include each person’s C.V. or résumé (5-page max) including contact information (complete mailing address, the institution or organization’s name (if applicable), an email address, and phone number). Please use the following link to submit. https://www.lincoln.edu/lincoln-university-and-voices-underground-railroad-conference-submission-form

Participants are responsible for their own lodging and transportation. 

Priority will be given to prospective participants who submit by October 15, 2021. After this date, the committee will review submissions on a rolling basis. We plan to announce the acceptance of regular submissions by December 15, 2021. 

Inquiries can be sent to ugrrconference@lincoln.edu

For further information please visit https://www.lincoln.edu/ugrrconference           

Convening Committee:

Dr. Nafeesa Muhammad 

Professor of History                                              

Lincoln University, PA

nmuhammad@lincoln.edu

Dr. Gregory Thompson

Executive Director | Voices Underground

greg@vuproject.org

www.vuproject.org

Dr. Paul Finkelman

President

Gratz College

pfinkelman@gratz.edu

Contact Info:  Dr. Nora Lynn Gardner at ugrrconference@lincoln.edu 

Contact Email: ugrrconference@lincoln.edu

URL: https://www.lincoln.edu/ugrrconference

CFP 2022 LACS-SHA

Latin American and Caribbean Section of the Southern Historical Association

Baltimore, Maryland, November 10-13, 2022

The Latin American and Caribbean Section (LACS) of the Southern Historical Association welcomes individual paper and panel proposals for the SHA’s 88th Annual Meeting to be held in Baltimore, Maryland, November 10-13. 

LACS accepts papers and panels on all aspects of Latin American and Caribbean history, including the fields of the borderlands and the Atlantic World. Panels and papers that highlight the connections between people, cultures, and regions are especially welcome. Submissions should include a 250-word abstract for each paper and brief (one-page) curriculum vitae for each presenter. We encourage faculty as well as advanced graduate students to submit panels and papers.  Presenters who will need AV equipment must request them as soon as the call from SHA appears.  

Graduate students are eligible for the Ralph Lee Woodward Jr. Prize, awarded each year for the best paper presented by a graduate student in a panel organized by LACS. 

Please note that the program committee may need to revise proposed panels. All panelists are required to be members of LACS before presenting. For information about membership, please visit the website at http://www.tnstate.edu/lacs/or contact Erica Johnson Edwards of the Francis Marion University: ejohnson@fmarion.edu. For more information about the Southern Historical Association, visit the website: http://thesha.org

Deadline for submissions is November 1, 2021. Complete panels are appreciated, but not required. 

Submit panels and papers to: Adriana Chira, Emory University: achira@emory.edu

Contact Info: Adriana Chira, Emory University

Contact Email: achira@emory.edu

CFP: PANDEMIC LEGACIES. Health, Healing and Medicine in the Age of Slavery and Beyond

2021 LAPIDUS CENTER CONFERENCE

October 7-8, 2021

Taking its cue from exciting new directions in slavery studies as well as our current health crisis, the virtual 2021 Lapidus Center Conference Pandemic Legacies will explore a variety of critical issues in the history of health, healing, and medicine in the age of Atlantic slavery via a combination of keynote conversations and panel sessions. 

Just as the slave trade tied together the cultures and populations of four continents, it also wed together distinctive disease ecologies. The lack of local populations with exploitable labor in the Americas compelled an increase in the volume of Africans that Europeans forced into the transatlantic slave trade, setting the stage for epidemic diseases and other health issues that shaped the cultural, social, and material life of Atlantic slavery. Genocidal warfare and the destructive effects of Eurasian African epidemic diseases caused the near decimation of Indigenous populations. Yellow fever, a virus native to tropical West Africa, became a common scourge to American ports. Doctors theorizing about the virus developed racial stereotypes that posited that people of African descent were inherently immune to the virus, setting the stage for a range of healthcare disparities that reverberate today.

In the last decade, a growing number of historians and other scholars have begun to grapple with a range of cultural, social, and material conditions that impacted health and healthcare under the slave system, providing significant insight into the care or lack of care for the lives (and deaths) of enslaved people. Impressive studies include those on enslaved healers in Brazil, the Caribbean, and the United States; analyses of how enslaved labor caused a host of disabilities for enslaved workers; and examinations of how enslaved laborers’ health on plantations informed racist ideas of Blackness meant to naturalize enslavement amidst abolitionist challenges.

The growth in this field and the urgency of our current moment wherein the confluence of COVID-19 and current reckonings around a range of  injustices, have made it clear that public conversations about race, health, and healing in the age of slavery are quite necessary. We invite abstracts on related topics. 

Topics may include, but are not limited to the following:

Disability histories of slavery

African diasporic healing and harming practices

Gender roles and caregiving during slavery in the Atlantic world

Gynecology and maternal health

Health, disease, and the construction of medical racism

The role of capitalism in shaping the health of plantation slavery

Enslaved communities’ responses to epidemic disease

Narratives that uncover how enslaved patients’ asserted their agency 

African diasporic death, afterlife, and interment beliefs

Slavery and the rise of the Eurasian African medical profession. (Note that medicine is used to describe a distinct, self-naming Eurasian African healing sect      spanning from Europe through the Islamic World)

Competition between enslaved healers and doctors of European descent

The role of the state in regulating the health of the slave system

African diasporic botanicals in the creation of Atlantic materia medica (early pharmacology)

Epidemic disease and rural labor in the present

Echoes of enslavement in COVID-19

The future of epidemics and racial inequity

By May 7, 2021 (extended deadline), please submit your 500-word panel or 250-word individual paper abstract to the attention of Dr. Michelle Commander, Associate Director and Curator of the Lapidus Center for the Historical Analysis of Transatlantic Slavery at the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture at lapidusconference at gmail dot com.

Decisions will be sent in June. 

Read more about the NYPL/Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture’s Lapidus Center here: lapiduscenter.org

URL: https://www.lapiduscenter.org/call-for-papers-2021-lapidus-center-conference-virtual/

CFP: The Problem of Piracy II: An Interdisciplinary Conference on Plunder by Sea across the World from the Ancient to the Modern

4-6 August 2021, Online Conference

The study of piracy brings with it several interpretational problems and questions. As a global phenomenon that has lasted millennia, even defining piracy historically is difficult. Its meaning depended on distinctive legal and customary perceptions of predation at sea by diverse communities, kingdoms, and empires. Scholarship on piracy and maritime predation has blossomed in recent years, but scholars still struggle to look at it with broad enough perspective. In August 2021, the second conference of the Problem of Piracy Network will explore the problem of piracy and its study across various chronological, geographical, and disciplinary barriers.

The Problem of Piracy Network formed in 2019 to investigate these and other questions in an inclusive, collegial environment. We welcome anyone studying any aspect of piracy and maritime predation from any time, place, or discipline. The network brings together a wide range of postgraduate, early career, and senior researchers from various disciplines. In addition to holding conferences, the network hosts online seminars and seeks publication opportunities for exceptional work.

The 2021 conference will be held entirely online to avoid any travel issues. The online conference will occur across three half-day sessions from 4-6 August 2021. The half-day sessions will be scheduled at different times across the three days in order to accommodate different time zones. Once we have compiled a prospective programme of papers, we will then confirm the time of each half-day session in order to best accommodate all participating speakers. The half-day sessions will include formal panels while also incorporating time for (optional) informal discussions in the form of breaks between panels. There will also be opportunity for a book launch event during the conference.

Possible themes, are not limited to, but include:

Non-Atlantic / non-European maritime predation (especially in the Indian and Pacific Oceans)

Perceptions of piracy and maritime predation

Suppressing piracy

Law of the sea 

Sovereignty and maritime predation

Gender and the sea

The pirate as a cultural figure

We welcome proposals for both individual papers of twenty minutes and three-paper panels that discuss any aspect of piracy and maritime predation occurring across the world’s oceans from the ancient to the modern period.

Abstracts of 250 words along with a short biographical note should be sent to John Coakley, Nathan Kwan, and David Wilson at problemofpiracyconference@outlook.com by 10pm (UTC) on 31 March 2021

Contact Info: 

Contact the Co-Directors of the Problem of Piracy Network – John Coakley,Nathan Kwan, and David Wilson – at problemofpiracyconference@outlook.com

Contact Email: problemofpiracyconference@outlook.com

URL: https://problemofpiracyconference.home.blog/

Religion and Politics in the United States

International Conference
(Zoom sessions:2 days/Virtual platform:5 days)

From H-Net, March 8 2021

Organizing Committee

Dr. Paulina Napierała 
Dr. Konstantinos D. Karatzas

Thematic Approach

GIRES, the Global Institute for Research, Education & Scholarship creates a welcoming space for discussion and exploration of the complicated relations between religion and politics in the United States.

“The United States is both remarkably religious and remarkably secular”. Although the US is a pluralist democracy, known for its multicultural identity, the  role of religion has been crucial in the formation of the nation’s identity and history, proving that the relationship between religion and politics is extremely complex and delicate.

Our new international conference seeks to bring together scholars from different countries who research a variety of topics related to the interactions between religion and politics in the United States from various perspectives. We define the terms “religion” and “politics” broadly and welcome all topics related to the way religion shapes politics or politics shapes religion. We want to examine how the two conflict, collaborate, or otherwise influence each other. The conference will explore the intersections between religion and politics in both historical and contemporary contexts.

We intend to create a space for interdisciplinary conversation. Thus, we invite submissions that address questions across a broad range of theoretical and methodological approaches – not only those of political science, but also of history, law, philosophy, religious studies, international relations, theology, sociology, minority studies, immigration studies, cultural studies, and/or psychology.

Proposed Topics (Lingua franca: English)

-Religion in American elections
-Religion and American foreign policy
-Religion in the early Republic
-Religion in the political thought of the Founding Fathers
-Religious clauses of the First Amendment: interpretations and contemporary controversies
-American Civil Religion – history and evolution
-Religious interest groups in the United States
-The evangelical vote
-The American Religious Right
-Culture wars in the American society
-Progressive Evangelicals and US politics
-The Religious Left
-Religious fundamentalisms in the Unites States
-Religious minorities’ rights and protections
-The role of religious minorities in American politics
-The political dynamics of religious pluralism in the United States
-Inter-denominational relations and their effects on politics
-Religious values and political stability of civil society
-Religion as a threat to contemporary civil society or the promise of protecting its liberal democratic character ?
-The role of Christianity in nationalism and neoliberalism
-Christian nationalism
-Conservative/liberal divisions within American religions
-Religion and immigration policies
-Religious freedom
-Constitutional and legal issues
-Instrumental use of religion in American politics
-Religion and populism
-The political role of the Black Church: past and present
-The influence of religion on international relations
-Secularization, privatization of religion, de-privatization of religion, post-secularism
-Psychology of religion and politics

Proposed Formats 

*Individually submitted papers (organized into panels by the GIRES committee)
*Panels (3-4 individual papers)
*Roundtable discussions (led by one of the presenters)
*Posters

Publication Opportunity
The Organizing Committee and GIRES Press will publish the most powerful and dynamic presentations of the conference and include them in a collective volume in the form of short articles and/or long essays. 

PROPOSAL SUBMISSION  (Please use our online application form found in the conference’s webpage)
DEADLINE FOR PROPOSALS: May, 10 2021
ACCEPTANCE NOTIFICATION: May, 16 2021
PUBLICATION: GIRES PRESS 
ACCREDITATION: Official Certificate Issued by GIRES 

FOR REGISTRATION FEES (Listerners and Presenters) Please visit the conference’s webpage.

———————————————————————————————————————————————-
Generating dialogue is of primary importance for our scholarly community and thus GIRES wishes to create a friendly and welcoming environment for all of our colleagues and offer all the tools to present their work in the best possible way.
———————————————————————————————————————————————-

Our proposed topics & formats are not restrictive and we invite additional germane ideas.
Due to the restrictions of Corona Crisis our event (for the time being) will take place virtually
Contact Info: 

GIRES-GLOBAL INSTITUTE FOR RESEARCH, EDUCATION & SCHOLARSHIP (Amsterdam, The Netherlands)

www.gires.org

Contact Email: info@gires.org

URL: https://www.gires.org/activities/conferences/religion-and-politics-in-the-united-states/

Search OpenEdition Search

You will be redirected to OpenEdition Search