Postcolonial Perspectives in Area Studies (special issue)

The journal Acta Universitatis Carolinae – Studia Territorialia invites authors to submit articles for a special issue titled “Postcolonial Perspectives in Area Studies.”

Postcolonialism as a lens through which the globalizing world can be viewed and explored is one of the most controversial issues in the humanities and social sciences. It has both enthusiastic endorsers and sworn opponents. For more than a half-century now, their disputes have mirrored the dynamic of the development of postcolonial discourse. In its approach to the legacy of colonialism and decolonization, the study of postcolonialism has taken on a new form under the influence of poststructuralism. The model of a final and universal divorce from the colonial past was replaced by the idea of a “multiplicity of histories” arising in varying territorial forms. Postcolonial discourse has fragmented, weakened in its global applicability, and been transformed into a plethora of local narratives.

With the rise of new social movements and the end of the Cold War, a new scheme of postcolonialism has appeared that brings together and interconnects the polycentric narratives. Postcolonialism is now being approached with a new kind of multicultural sensitivity. This new direction of research has resulted in a critical reinterpretation of historically and spatially fixed forms of inequality, oppression and exclusion, with the goal of overcoming their consequences in the real world. The study of postcolonialism has broadened its attention to include post-communist nations, relations between East and West, and newly emerging power structures in the present world, among other topics. 

This special issue aims to conceptualize postcolonial theory from different disciplinary angles. It will focus on the various territorial contexts in which control, domination, and exclusion occur. Furthermore, it will seek to analyze the rise and development of social and political movements that are striving to deal with the mechanisms of power. In line with the territorial emphasis of Studia Territorialia, contributions should focus on North America, Europe, and post-Soviet Eurasia. However, studies of other regional contexts are welcome as well, provided they have a strong link to the regions covered by the journal. 

Topics may include, but are not limited to:
• Colonialism and modernization
• Colonialism in the Cold War era
• The Soviet Bloc as a colonial system
• Migration and mobility between metropolises and colonies
• Reshaping the relationship between the colonizing and the colonized
• Legacy of colonialism and colonial inertia as a sort of path-dependency
• Deconstruction of the colonial cultural legacy
• Postcolonial identities
• Self-colonization
• Memories of colonialism and decolonization
• Colonial nostalgia
• Colonialism as a trauma
• Coming to terms with the colonial past
• Decolonization of the public space and culture
• Discursive strategies and practices of colonialism and postcolonialism
• Postcolonialism as a political agenda
• Postcolonial discourse in international relations
• Postcolonialism and gender studies
• Postcolonial perspectives on racial issues
• Theories of postcolonialism

Articles should be in English and should ideally be 6,000 to 9,000 words long (excluding footnotes and abstract). Submissions should be sent to the journal’s editorial team at stuter@fsv.cuni.cz or uploaded via the Studia Territorialia journal management system. Authors should consult the submission guidelines on the journal’s website for further instructions and preferred style. All contributions will be subject to double-blind peer review. 

Abstract submission deadline: January 31, 2022.
Notification of status and next steps: February 10, 2022.
Article submission deadline: April 30, 2022.

Studia Territorialia is a leading Czech peer-reviewed academic journal focusing on area studies. It covers the history and the social, political, and cultural affairs of the nations of North America, Europe, and post-Soviet Eurasia in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. The journal is published by the Institute of International Studies of Charles University, Prague. It is indexed in the SCOPUS, ERIH PLUS, EBSCO, DOAJ, and CEEOL databases and others. 

For further inquiries, please feel free to contact the editors.Contact Info: 

Lucie Filipová, Studia Territorialia executive editor

Contact Email: stuter@fsv.cuni.cz

URL: https://stuter.fsv.cuni.cz

The New American Antiquarian, no. 1

Call for Papers

The New American Antiquarian (NAA), a new peer-reviewed journal dedicated to reconstructing the hemispheric American past to 1825 A.D. through the publication of critically edited source material, invites submissions for its inaugural issue.

NAA welcomes submissions of previously unpublished manuscript transcriptions; new English translations; collations of printed material; guides or catalogs that aid in the interpretation of source collections; and scholarship that interrogates the American archive. NAA is committed to expanding the source base and scholarly horizon of early American history and literature to reflect the hemisphere’s plural linguistic traditions.

We encourage submissions of sources or scholarship written in Spanish or French, though all publications will eventually be printed in English. The journal is additionally committed to publishing work that originates from a broad swathe of humanistic disciplines as well as from outside the academy.

The NAA envisions itself as a platform that enriches current intellectual discussions of historical evidence by fostering a new scholarly discourse around the reception and antiquation of ideas, practices, and institutions. We are interested in generating conversation around the intersection of—and slippage between—history, the archive, and knowledge of the past. Our mission entails a wider consideration of early America within a vast intellectual tradition of transatlantic antiquity.

We welcome submissions of up to 10,000 words (excluding footnotes)/ 14,000 words (including footnotes). All submissions should be formatted in Chicago style. NAA intends to publish its issues in PDF format. Authors are welcome to submit digital supplements, such as XML files or photographs of archival documents, for parallel distribution through NAA’s platform. The editors will anonymize submissions for the peer-review process. We hope to develop an accessible online submission platform in the near future.

NAA is edited by Peter Jakob Olsen-Harbich (pjolsenharbich@email.wm.edu) and Simeon A. Simeonov (simeon_simeonov@alumni.brown.edu). All submissions should be sent to newamericanantiquarian@gmail.com.

We are also interested in expanding our editorial board, reviewer pool, and potentially in forming a relationship with an academic press. We welcome all interested readers to contact us via the institutional email above, and to follow us on Twitter: @new_antiquarian

Extended Deadline CFP: “Contagious Connections: Epidemic Disease in Vast Early America and the Atlantic World.”

by Claire Gherini, re-posted from H-Atlantic 14/06/2021

The Omohundro Institute of Early American History & Culture invites applications from scholars across academic disciplines for participation in a series of workshops dedicated to revisiting and rethinking the history and historiography of epidemics in Vast Early America and the Atlantic World. Co-chaired by Ryan Kashnanipour (University of Arizona) and Claire Gherini (Fordham University), “Contagious Connections” is a series of six works-in-progress seminars that will take place, online, between January and May 2022 in which participants will convene to discuss and workshop pre-circulated papers. We invite proposals for unpublished, chapter-length pieces on epidemics in Vast Early America/The Atlantic World for those workshops. 

Epidemics were a foundational force in the early history of the Americas and the larger Atlantic World. Yet their interdisciplinary and comparative analysis has often been restricted by the imperial and chronological priorities of these regions’ subfields as well as older biomedical and demographic approaches to the study of disease. Rather than rehashing whether acquired immunity destined Native Americans to extirpation and Africans for slavery in the Americas, this series proceeds from the idea that epidemics are epistemological and ontological forces: they have a historical materiality but become epidemics of a particular disease when historical actors collectively decide to name and treat them as such. We invite paper submissions that engage with epidemics and/or infectious diseases beyond their biological attributes. We are open to papers of many kinds, possible themes and questions might include:

  • The political and social ramifications, in particular times and places, of naming widespread infirmity an epidemic. How do such pronouncements and definitions work to mobilize resources? What populations do they render legible? Which figures and administrative bodies got to make these definitions?
  • What administrative differences between empires rendered such pronouncements and definitions easier to make and contest, as well as see in the archive?
  • How did the divergent temporalities of so-called crowd diseases’ (smallpox, yellow fever, measles for example) and those that are more chronic disorders (yaws, coco-bays, dropsy) shape official and quotidian responses to them?
  • Naming generalized infirmity an epidemic magnifies its visibility in the archive. Papers might explore the more quotidian types of infirmity that have been overlooked as a consequence and how they were managed and thought about by the communities affected by them.
  • Papers might use the uneven impact of different epidemics as a window onto the endemic nature of illness in the early modern Americas and underlying health disparities.
  • Sudden and widespread sickness tends to galvanize discovery of its modes of communication. To think about the materiality of epidemics, papers might focus on how these discoveries reconfigure mobility and daily habits of living. Or they might use authorities’ efforts to regulate or outlaw quotidian practices of bodily health or sustenance to recover what are often overlooked materials and practices that are central to gendered and racialized economies of care.
  • Papers might explore the development of new forms mourning, internment, and memorialization that communities developed to reckon with the new scale of death created by an epidemic.

As we hope to see this series culminate in a community of scholars who might polish their works for collective publication in an edited collection, in summer 2022, should conditions allow, we may convene in-person in Washington D.C. for one week for a second round of workshops where participants will present and receive feedback on revised versions of their papers.

The original deadline for submissions has been extended. Interested individuals are asked to submit an abstract no longer than 500 words and abbreviated CV no longer than three pages by JULY 15, 2021:

https://oieahc.wm.edu/ninja-forms/10q8qb/

For more information please go to: https://oieahc.wm.edu/events/contagious-connections/

CONTAGIOUS CONNECTIONS: Epidemic disease in the Vast Early Americas

OIEAHC CFP

From the OIEAHC Website

The Omohundro Institute of Early American History & Culture invites proposals from scholars across academic disciplines and ranks for a series of workshops dedicated to revisiting and rethinking the history and historiography of epidemics in Vast Early America and the Atlantic World. Co-chaired by Ryan Kashnanipour (University of Arizona) and Claire Gherini (Fordham University), “Contagious Connections” will build from a series of conversations with established scholars in fall 2021 to a workshop in spring 2022. We invite proposals of works in progress on epidemics in the early Americas for that workshop. 

Epidemics were a foundational force in the early history of the Americas and the larger Atlantic World. Yet their interdisciplinary and comparative analysis has often been restricted by the imperial and temporal priorities of these regions’ subfields as well as older biomedical and demographic approaches to the study of disease. Rather than rehashing whether acquired immunity destined Native Americans to extirpation and Africans for slavery in the Americas, this series proceeds from the idea that epidemics are epistemological and ontological forces: they have a historical materiality but become epidemics of a particular disease when historical actors collectively decide to name and treat them as such. We invite paper submissions from scholars of any discipline writing on any region of either Vast Early America or the Atlantic World, 1400-1830 that engage with epidemics and/or infectious diseases beyond their biological attributes.

We are open to papers of many kinds, possible themes and questions might include:

The political and social ramifications, in particular times and places, of naming widespread infirmity an epidemic. How do such pronouncements and definitions work to mobilize resources? What populations do they render legible? Which figures and administrative bodies got to make these definitions?

What administrative differences between empires rendered such pronouncements and definitions easier to make and contest, as well as see in the archive?

How did the divergent temporalities of so-called crowd diseases’ (smallpox, yellow fever, measles for example) and those that are more chronic disorders (yaws, coco-bays, dropsy) shape official and quotidian responses to them?

Naming generalized infirmity an epidemic magnifies its visibility in the archive. Papers might explore the more quotidian types of infirmity that have been overlooked as a consequence and how they were managed and thought about by the communities affected by them.

Papers might use the uneven impact of different epidemics as a window onto the endemic nature of illness in the early modern Americas and underlying health disparities.

Sudden and widespread sickness tends to galvanize discovery of its modes of communication. To think about the materiality of epidemics, papers might focus on how these discoveries reconfigure mobility and daily habits of living. Or they might use authorities’ efforts to regulate or outlaw quotidian practices of bodily health or sustenance to recover what are often overlooked materials and practices that are central to gendered and racialized economies of care.

Papers might explore the development of new forms mourning, internment, and memorialization that communities developed to reckon with the new scale of death created by an epidemic.

We hope to see this series culminate in a community of scholars who might polish their works for collective publication. In spring 2022, between January and May, we will hold a series of workshops to discuss pre-circulated papers with select presenters, leading specialists, and scholars in the field. Papers should be chapter length (no longer than 10,000 words) drafts of works in progress. In summer 2022, should conditions allow, we may also convene for a week-long in person meeting to present revised versions of their papers for a second round of workshops.

Interested individuals are asked to submit an abbreviated CV no longer than three pages and an abstract no longer than 500 words by June 15, 2021:

APPLY HERE

For more information, please feel free to contact Ryan Kashanipour (rykash@arizona.edu) or Claire Gherini (cgherini@fordham.edu).