CFP: Fort Ticonderoga Seminar on the American Revolution

September 23-25, 2022

Fort Ticonderoga seeks proposals for the Eighteenth Annual Seminar on the American Revolution to be held Friday-Sunday, September 23-25, 2022. 

Many states, as well as national entities, are already beginning the process of planning for the commemoration of the 250th anniversary of American Independence. Current events, from the end of America’s longest war of Afghanistan, to fundamental questions about the democracy that was created nearly 250 years ago provide new context to explorations of one of the longest, bitterest, and most consequential conflicts in American history.

The Fort Ticonderoga Museum seeks proposals for new research on this critical period of the 18th century from a variety of perspectives, participants, and methodologies. Established scholars, graduate students, and others are encouraged to submit abstracts of papers broadly addressing the origins, conduct, or repercussions of the War for American Independence. We are especially interested in topics and approaches that engage the international nature of the conflict, representing the variety of peoples and places involved. 

We welcome interdisciplinary backgrounds and approaches roughly covering the period from the 1760s to the 1780s. Papers may include or engage:

  • Material Culture
  • Biographical Analysis
  • Social and Cultural Histories
  • Global Theatres of War 
  • Archaeological Studies
  • Indigenous Perspectives

Sessions are 30 minutes in length followed by 10 minutes for audience questions. Fort Ticonderoga may provide speakers with partial travel reimbursement.

Please submit a 300-word abstract and CV by email by January 31, 2022, to Richard M. Strum, Director of Academic Programs: rstrum@fort-ticonderoga.org

Contact Info: Richard M. Strum, Director of Academic Programs, Fort Ticonderoga.

Contact Email: rstrum@fort-ticonderoga.org

URL: https://www.fortticonderoga.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/FINAL-CFP-Fort-Ticonderoga-Seminar-on-the-American-Revolution…

Consortium on Revolutionary Era Annual Conference: February 10-12, 2022

The Consortium on the Revolutionary Era invites proposals for its 52nd annual conference to be held February 10-12, 2022, at Mississippi State University in Starkville, MS.  The Consortium (CRE) welcomes papers on any topic related to the period 1750-1850 in any geographical location.   While the conference has traditionally welcomed scholars focusing on Europe, the United States, and the Atlantic World, we would also welcome panels that expand our understanding of the Revolutionary Era to include the Pacific, Latin America, Africa, and all places in between.    

We invite submissions of both individual papers and fully formed sessions from faculty, graduate students, and independent scholars working in any discipline and on any topic exploring the Revolutionary Era.  In addition to standard sessions (three or four papers, plus a chair and a commentator) and roundtables (five or six ten-minute presentations), we will also consider any innovative ideas for session formats—including presentation and discussion via distance technologies. 

Session proposals should include a panel description, a brief abstract for each paper (no more than one page), and a brief CV for each participant (no more than 2 pages.) Individual paper proposals should include a brief abstract (one page) and CV (no more than 2 pages).  Proposals from graduate students and independent scholars are welcome.  We urge panel organizers to consider diversity of presenters and topics as they build their sessions. Preference will be given to panels that capture gender, racial, and stage-in-career diversity. Please submit proposals to Dr. Marc Lerner (mlerner@olemiss.edu) by November 1, 2020.

For more information about the CRE and the conference, visit the CRE Website (https://www.revolutionaryera.org/).

Contact Info: 

Dr. Marc Lerner

University of Mississippi

Contact Email: mlerner@olemiss.edu

URL: https://www.revolutionaryera.org/

MHR Call for Papers: Representation in American History

Proposal Deadline: 15 June 2020
From the Massachusetts Historical Society Website, March 24, 2021
Since its first volume in 1999, theMassachusetts Historical Review (MHR) has published original analytical essays, photo-essays, historical documents, and reviews for a general audience. Beginning in 2021, a new series of the MHR will devote each issue to a theme connected with Massachusetts history, although the essays in the volume need not be limited to Massachusetts or New England topics.  The publication of the third volume of the new series will coincide with the 250th anniversary of the Boston Tea Party.
On the evening of 16 December 1773, American colonists opposed to the Tea Act seriously escalated their decade-long protest against the authority of Parliament to make laws that affected the North American colonies. Having chanted “no taxation without representation” through several legal and economic clashes with Parliament, the Sons of Liberty led this raid on ships carrying British East India Company tea anchored in Boston Harbor. Heaving hundreds of chests of tea into the murky water, these individuals took matters into their own hands, setting the colonies and the metropole on a course that would culminate in revolution and war. In the decades and centuries since, the Boston Tea Party has become a productive image, used in support of numerous demands for representation in other times and contexts.  Using the Boston Tea Party as a starting point, volume 3 of the MHR’s new series will focus on the theme of representation, broadly conceived. Essays may address the theme in a variety of ways, including but not limited to political representation, cultural representation, and historical representation. However, the idea of representation must be integral to the material examined and must be addressed directly as a key aspect of the analysis/argument.
The MHR invites interested authors to submit proposals for original essays concerning representation in any era of American history and speaking to a general audience. Preference will be given to essays that connect in some manner to Massachusetts and New England. The journal welcomes submissions from authors pursuing research in history or related fields (such as American Studies or American Literature) at all career stages, including graduate students, tenured faculty members, and independent scholars.  Interested parties should submit a current curriculum vitae along with a one-page (double-spaced) proposal that outlines the subject the author seeks to pursue and its connection to the theme, the sources employed, and the intervention in relevant historical scholarship to mhr@masshist.org by June 15, 2021. By July 15, 2021, authors with successful proposals will receive an invitation to submit a completed draft of their essay for consideration. First drafts of essays selected will be due by December 1, 2021, and must be 7,500–10,000 words. All drafts will undergo a rigorous peer-review process by both MHS staff and outside readers prior to publication.
Questions? Please write to mhr@masshist.org.

Religion and Politics in the United States

International Conference
(Zoom sessions:2 days/Virtual platform:5 days)

From H-Net, March 8 2021

Organizing Committee

Dr. Paulina Napierała 
Dr. Konstantinos D. Karatzas

Thematic Approach

GIRES, the Global Institute for Research, Education & Scholarship creates a welcoming space for discussion and exploration of the complicated relations between religion and politics in the United States.

“The United States is both remarkably religious and remarkably secular”. Although the US is a pluralist democracy, known for its multicultural identity, the  role of religion has been crucial in the formation of the nation’s identity and history, proving that the relationship between religion and politics is extremely complex and delicate.

Our new international conference seeks to bring together scholars from different countries who research a variety of topics related to the interactions between religion and politics in the United States from various perspectives. We define the terms “religion” and “politics” broadly and welcome all topics related to the way religion shapes politics or politics shapes religion. We want to examine how the two conflict, collaborate, or otherwise influence each other. The conference will explore the intersections between religion and politics in both historical and contemporary contexts.

We intend to create a space for interdisciplinary conversation. Thus, we invite submissions that address questions across a broad range of theoretical and methodological approaches – not only those of political science, but also of history, law, philosophy, religious studies, international relations, theology, sociology, minority studies, immigration studies, cultural studies, and/or psychology.

Proposed Topics (Lingua franca: English)

-Religion in American elections
-Religion and American foreign policy
-Religion in the early Republic
-Religion in the political thought of the Founding Fathers
-Religious clauses of the First Amendment: interpretations and contemporary controversies
-American Civil Religion – history and evolution
-Religious interest groups in the United States
-The evangelical vote
-The American Religious Right
-Culture wars in the American society
-Progressive Evangelicals and US politics
-The Religious Left
-Religious fundamentalisms in the Unites States
-Religious minorities’ rights and protections
-The role of religious minorities in American politics
-The political dynamics of religious pluralism in the United States
-Inter-denominational relations and their effects on politics
-Religious values and political stability of civil society
-Religion as a threat to contemporary civil society or the promise of protecting its liberal democratic character ?
-The role of Christianity in nationalism and neoliberalism
-Christian nationalism
-Conservative/liberal divisions within American religions
-Religion and immigration policies
-Religious freedom
-Constitutional and legal issues
-Instrumental use of religion in American politics
-Religion and populism
-The political role of the Black Church: past and present
-The influence of religion on international relations
-Secularization, privatization of religion, de-privatization of religion, post-secularism
-Psychology of religion and politics

Proposed Formats 

*Individually submitted papers (organized into panels by the GIRES committee)
*Panels (3-4 individual papers)
*Roundtable discussions (led by one of the presenters)
*Posters

Publication Opportunity
The Organizing Committee and GIRES Press will publish the most powerful and dynamic presentations of the conference and include them in a collective volume in the form of short articles and/or long essays. 

PROPOSAL SUBMISSION  (Please use our online application form found in the conference’s webpage)
DEADLINE FOR PROPOSALS: May, 10 2021
ACCEPTANCE NOTIFICATION: May, 16 2021
PUBLICATION: GIRES PRESS 
ACCREDITATION: Official Certificate Issued by GIRES 

FOR REGISTRATION FEES (Listerners and Presenters) Please visit the conference’s webpage.

———————————————————————————————————————————————-
Generating dialogue is of primary importance for our scholarly community and thus GIRES wishes to create a friendly and welcoming environment for all of our colleagues and offer all the tools to present their work in the best possible way.
———————————————————————————————————————————————-

Our proposed topics & formats are not restrictive and we invite additional germane ideas.
Due to the restrictions of Corona Crisis our event (for the time being) will take place virtually
Contact Info: 

GIRES-GLOBAL INSTITUTE FOR RESEARCH, EDUCATION & SCHOLARSHIP (Amsterdam, The Netherlands)

www.gires.org

Contact Email: info@gires.org

URL: https://www.gires.org/activities/conferences/religion-and-politics-in-the-united-states/

CFPs The Meaning of Independence

October 21-22, 2021, APS, Philadelphia

As the United States nears the 250th anniversary of its Declaration of Independence, the David Center for the American Revolution at the American Philosophical Society is organizing an international conference on “The Meanings of Independence,” to be held in Philadelphia in October 2021. The conference aims to convene leading and emerging scholars of the era, museum and library professionals, leaders of cultural institutions, teachers at all levels, public intellectuals, and engaged members of the public for two days of discussion about the meaning and import of the American Revolution in the twenty-first century.

We invite proposals from scholars and professionals at all levels of their careers whose work can contribute to this conversation. Conference organizers hope to highlight new scholarship on the causes, course, and consequences of the American Revolution; the lived experience of the Revolution; its place within a global context; innovative plans for commemorations in 2026; and compelling digital and new media scholarship that presents the era in a new light and to a wide audience.  

Potential topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

Origins :

New interpretations of the cause of the American Revolution

Examinations of overlooked events and individuals that cast new light on the Revolution’s cause

Experiences :

The role of warfare on society and its lasting significance 

The meanings and consequences of independence, for the various peoples affected by war and political upheaval—including loyalists, enslaved men and women, Indigenous peoples, and non-combatants

Perspectives from the top-down and bottom-up, and their interplay throughout the course of the Revolution

Global Contexts:

Papers that place the Revolution within the Age of Atlantic Revolutions

The effects of the American Revolution around the globe within its own time and after it, including to the present day

Other comparative frameworks that help elucidate elements of the Revolution

Legacies:

The changing meaning of the Revolution for those who lived through it

Research that interrogates the idea of a founding moment or moments, including papers that provide a comparative perspective from other countries

Legacies of independence in shaping lives, institutions, and ideals of citizenship and patriotism

Examinations of past commemorations as well as plans for future ones

Teaching the Revolution, past, present, and future 

Innovative digital and archival projects that provide new access to study of the era

We welcome proposals that touch on these topics, or on related ones. We will consider papers employing a range of approaches—historical, literary, religious, environmental, legal, political, or focused on material culture, gender, Native American and Indigenous studies, public history, digital scholarship, and otherwise.

The committee hopes this conference can generate ideas and produce conversations that last beyond this event. In order to maximize the opportunity for informal and formal discussion and collaboration, conference organizers plan to hold this gathering in-person. Should travel in October be unadvisable, the conference will be rescheduled for Spring 2022. While the conference will be held in person, organizers are determined to create meaningful opportunities for those unable to attend in person to participate.

All presenters will receive travel subsidies and hotel accommodations. Accepted papers will be due a month before the conference and pre-circulated to registered attendees. Papers should be no longer than 15 double-spaced pages. Presenters may also have the opportunity to publish revised papers in the APS’s Transactions, one of the longest running scholarly series in America.

Applicants should submit a title, a 250-word proposal, and a C.V. by April 15, 2021 via Interfolio: https://apply.interfolio.com/84649

Decisions will be announced in June 2021.

For more information, visit https://www.amphilsoc.org/, or contact Kyle Roberts, Associate Director for Library and Museum Programming at kroberts@amphilsoc.org or Adrianna Link, Head of Scholarly Programs, at alink@amphilsoc.org

Contact Email: alink@amphilsoc.org

URL: https://www.amphilsoc.org/blog/cfp-meanings-independence-october-21-22-2021